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Walter Johnson was a pitching legend in Major League Baseball. His record was 416 wins and 279 losses. In his games won, he did so with 110 shutouts.

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Q: What was the number of shut out games that were won by baseball pitcher Walter Johnson?
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What number of games did baseball pitcher Walter Johnson win?

Walter Johnson was one of baseball's greatest pitchers. He won a total of 416 games.


What was remarkable about baseball pitcher Walter Johnson?

The term of "remarkable" is difficult to define. That is unless one checks the vast number of baseball records set by the large number of them spanning baseball's long existence. Many sports writers would clearly say that Walter Johnson had a remarkable career. His career stands out and is certainly remarkable when one considers his overall pitching record with a sub-par team, the Washington Senators. Despite what is called support runs, Johnson's career stands at 416 wins vs 279 losses. That clearly speaks to his longevity but what is truly remarkable is that among his 416 victories, he had 110 shut outs!Not bad as he was playing with the Senators.


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What Seattle Mariners players have worn the number 51?

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In high school baseball box scores what are batteries and the number in paretheses mean?

A pitcher and catcher are called a 'battery'. A number in parenthesis next to a player's name would mean the inning the pitcher/catcher came into the game. The starting pitcher and catcher do not have a number in parenthesis next to their names.


What is the value of a Walter Johnson hall of fame card?

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What were some of the modern batting stats for baseball player Walter Johnson in 1907?

In 1907, Walter Johnson played for the Washington Senators. On Base Percentage (OBP) is considered by many to be a better measure of a great hitter than the Batting Average. It is calculated with the formula (Hits + Walks + Hit by Pitch) / (At Bats + Walks + Hit by Pitch + Sacrifice Flies). In 1907, Walter Johnson had 36 at bats, 4 hits, 1 walk, and was hit by the pitch 0 times. Sacrifice flies weren't counted before 1954. That gives him an On Base Percentage of .135. Slugging Percentage (SLG) is a popular measure of a batter's power. It is calculated as (Total Bases) / (At Bats). Another way to look at it is (Singles + 2 x Doubles + 3 x Triples + 4 x Home Runs) / (At Bats). In 1907, Walter Johnson had 36 at bats, and hit 3 singles, 0 doubles, 1 triple, and 0 home runs, for a .167 slugging percentage. Being able to get on base and to hit for power are two of the most important offensive skills in baseball, so the On Base Percentage and Slugging Percentage are often added together. On-base plus slugging (OPS) is a sabermetric baseball statistic. The best hitters in Major League Baseball can achieve an OPS of .900 or higher. In 1907, Walter Johnson had a .135 On Base Percentage and a .167 Slugging Percentage for an OPS of .302. Runs Created (RC) is a baseball statistic invented by Bill James to estimate the number of runs a hitter contributes to his team. There are a number of formulas used to calculate it. One of the simplest is (On Base Percentage) × (Total Bases). In 1907, Walter Johnson had a .135 On Base Percentage and 6 Total Bases for .81 Runs Created.


What were some of the modern batting stats for baseball player Walter Johnson in 1908?

In 1908, Walter Johnson played for the Washington Senators. On Base Percentage (OBP) is considered by many to be a better measure of a great hitter than the Batting Average. It is calculated with the formula (Hits + Walks + Hit by Pitch) / (At Bats + Walks + Hit by Pitch + Sacrifice Flies). In 1908, Walter Johnson had 79 at bats, 13 hits, 6 walks, and was hit by the pitch 3 times. Sacrifice flies weren't counted before 1954. That gives him an On Base Percentage of .250. Slugging Percentage (SLG) is a popular measure of a batter's power. It is calculated as (Total Bases) / (At Bats). Another way to look at it is (Singles + 2 x Doubles + 3 x Triples + 4 x Home Runs) / (At Bats). In 1908, Walter Johnson had 79 at bats, and hit 8 singles, 3 doubles, 2 triples, and 0 home runs, for a .253 slugging percentage. Being able to get on base and to hit for power are two of the most important offensive skills in baseball, so the On Base Percentage and Slugging Percentage are often added together. On-base plus slugging (OPS) is a sabermetric baseball statistic. The best hitters in Major League Baseball can achieve an OPS of .900 or higher. In 1908, Walter Johnson had a .250 On Base Percentage and a .253 Slugging Percentage for an OPS of .503. Runs Created (RC) is a baseball statistic invented by Bill James to estimate the number of runs a hitter contributes to his team. There are a number of formulas used to calculate it. One of the simplest is (On Base Percentage) × (Total Bases). In 1908, Walter Johnson had a .250 On Base Percentage and 20 Total Bases for 5.00 Runs Created.


What were some of the modern batting stats for baseball player Walter Johnson in 1909?

In 1909, Walter Johnson played for the Washington Senators. On Base Percentage (OBP) is considered by many to be a better measure of a great hitter than the Batting Average. It is calculated with the formula (Hits + Walks + Hit by Pitch) / (At Bats + Walks + Hit by Pitch + Sacrifice Flies). In 1909, Walter Johnson had 101 at bats, 13 hits, 1 walk, and was hit by the pitch 0 times. Sacrifice flies weren't counted before 1954. That gives him an On Base Percentage of .137. Slugging Percentage (SLG) is a popular measure of a batter's power. It is calculated as (Total Bases) / (At Bats). Another way to look at it is (Singles + 2 x Doubles + 3 x Triples + 4 x Home Runs) / (At Bats). In 1909, Walter Johnson had 101 at bats, and hit 9 singles, 3 doubles, 0 triples, and 1 home run, for a .188 slugging percentage. Being able to get on base and to hit for power are two of the most important offensive skills in baseball, so the On Base Percentage and Slugging Percentage are often added together. On-base plus slugging (OPS) is a sabermetric baseball statistic. The best hitters in Major League Baseball can achieve an OPS of .900 or higher. In 1909, Walter Johnson had a .137 On Base Percentage and a .188 Slugging Percentage for an OPS of .325. Runs Created (RC) is a baseball statistic invented by Bill James to estimate the number of runs a hitter contributes to his team. There are a number of formulas used to calculate it. One of the simplest is (On Base Percentage) × (Total Bases). In 1909, Walter Johnson had a .137 On Base Percentage and 19 Total Bases for 2.61 Runs Created.


What were some of the modern batting stats for baseball player Walter Johnson in 1911?

In 1911, Walter Johnson played for the Washington Senators. On Base Percentage (OBP) is considered by many to be a better measure of a great hitter than the Batting Average. It is calculated with the formula (Hits + Walks + Hit by Pitch) / (At Bats + Walks + Hit by Pitch + Sacrifice Flies). In 1911, Walter Johnson had 128 at bats, 30 hits, 0 walks, and was hit by the pitch 0 times. Sacrifice flies weren't counted before 1954. That gives him an On Base Percentage of .234. Slugging Percentage (SLG) is a popular measure of a batter's power. It is calculated as (Total Bases) / (At Bats). Another way to look at it is (Singles + 2 x Doubles + 3 x Triples + 4 x Home Runs) / (At Bats). In 1911, Walter Johnson had 128 at bats, and hit 21 singles, 5 doubles, 3 triples, and 1 home run, for a .344 slugging percentage. Being able to get on base and to hit for power are two of the most important offensive skills in baseball, so the On Base Percentage and Slugging Percentage are often added together. On-base plus slugging (OPS) is a sabermetric baseball statistic. The best hitters in Major League Baseball can achieve an OPS of .900 or higher. In 1911, Walter Johnson had a .234 On Base Percentage and a .344 Slugging Percentage for an OPS of .578. Runs Created (RC) is a baseball statistic invented by Bill James to estimate the number of runs a hitter contributes to his team. There are a number of formulas used to calculate it. One of the simplest is (On Base Percentage) × (Total Bases). In 1911, Walter Johnson had a .234 On Base Percentage and 44 Total Bases for 10.31 Runs Created.


What were some of the modern batting stats for baseball player Walter Johnson in 1912?

In 1912, Walter Johnson played for the Washington Senators. On Base Percentage (OBP) is considered by many to be a better measure of a great hitter than the Batting Average. It is calculated with the formula (Hits + Walks + Hit by Pitch) / (At Bats + Walks + Hit by Pitch + Sacrifice Flies). In 1912, Walter Johnson had 144 at bats, 38 hits, 7 walks, and was hit by the pitch 0 times. Sacrifice flies weren't counted before 1954. That gives him an On Base Percentage of .298. Slugging Percentage (SLG) is a popular measure of a batter's power. It is calculated as (Total Bases) / (At Bats). Another way to look at it is (Singles + 2 x Doubles + 3 x Triples + 4 x Home Runs) / (At Bats). In 1912, Walter Johnson had 144 at bats, and hit 26 singles, 6 doubles, 4 triples, and 2 home runs, for a .403 slugging percentage. Being able to get on base and to hit for power are two of the most important offensive skills in baseball, so the On Base Percentage and Slugging Percentage are often added together. On-base plus slugging (OPS) is a sabermetric baseball statistic. The best hitters in Major League Baseball can achieve an OPS of .900 or higher. In 1912, Walter Johnson had a .298 On Base Percentage and a .403 Slugging Percentage for an OPS of .701. Runs Created (RC) is a baseball statistic invented by Bill James to estimate the number of runs a hitter contributes to his team. There are a number of formulas used to calculate it. One of the simplest is (On Base Percentage) × (Total Bases). In 1912, Walter Johnson had a .298 On Base Percentage and 58 Total Bases for 17.28 Runs Created.