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Shahid Afridi...(by biting the ball)

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โˆ™ 2010-02-15 09:38:40
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Q: Who took don bradmans wicket more often than any other bowler?
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Who was first Indian bowler reach 300 wickets in Odi's?

Anil Kumble reached 300 wickets on 6 November 2002. As of May 2008, the only other Indian bowler to reach that total is Javagal Srinath, who took his 300th wicket on 12 February 2003.


What are the officials of cricket?

On the field there are two Umpires, one stands at the wicket (from where the bowler bowls) & the other is at square leg (Which is level with the batting crease on the leg side of the wicket) they count the balls in the over, hold clothing not needed by the bowler when he is bowling, making sure the ball is delivered correctly and officiate on run making & whether the batsman is or is not out. In doing this there are a set number of signals they make to the scorers: Fours, Sixes, Extras & so on.


In cricket who act as officials?

On the field there are two Umpires, one stands at the wicket (from where the bowler bowls) & the other is at square leg (Which is level with the batting crease on the leg side of the wicket) they count the balls in the over, hold clothing not needed by the bowler when he is bowling, making sure the ball is delivered correctly and officiate on run making & whether the batsman is or is not out. In doing this there are a set number of signals they make to the scorers: Fours, Sixes, Extras & so on.


What was Sir Donald Bradmans occupation other than cricket?

Sir donald bradman's occupation other than cricket was hockey


Who was the first New Zealand blackcap to get 300 wickets?

Richard Hadlee was the first New Zealand bowler to take 300 wickets in Test Matches, and currently the leading test wicket-taker in New Zealand. The other New Zealander to get 300 test wickets was Daniel Vettori. No New Zealand bowler is yet to take 300 wickets in ODIs or T20s.


How do you calculate a bowling strike rate in cricket?

A bowlers strike rate is calculated by dividing the number of balls he or she has bowled by the number of wickets taken with those balls. For example if a bowler has bowled 2000 balls in his career and has taken 50 wickets, he has a bowling strike rate of 40.00. In other words the bowler has taken, on average, a wicket every 40 balls.


How do you take wickets in EA sports cricket 2007?

use a FAST BOWLER and bowl the other side of the wicket (OPPOSITE SIDE TO BATSMAN) and cut the ball full into the STUMPS. Stumps would surely fly... It happens when the batsman confidence is quite high in TEST matches and ODI's.


Who is the fastest bowler in cricket?

The world's undisputed fastest bowler is Shaun Tait of Australia. He has bowled over 160 kmph on several occasions and is easily faster than any other bowler in the world.


How do you play Cricket?

Ok, it has two teams, you play on an oval field which has a rectangular pitch, you play in the middle of it, the pitch is 22 yards in length, each team has 11 players, and generally 1 sub player, at the start of the game, the captain from each team goes out to the middle with the umpires. And you toss a coin and whoever wins the toss has a choice to bat or field first. Batting: when batting you have two batsman in centre at a time* The batsman are your openers, then you have between 5 and 7 middle order batmen, and then to follow between 2 and 4 lower order batsman, who are generally when you are fielding, your bowlers. Your objective when batting is to score as many runs as you can in the allotted number of overs, and to lose as few wickets as possible. Fielding: the fielding side has all 11 players out in the centre, the fielding side consists of a wicket keeper, a bowler and 9 fielders. A bowler's objective is to have as few runs scored off his over as possible and to try and take wickets. The fielder's objective is when the batsman hits the ball, to stop runs from actually being scored by stopping the ball. Runs: Runs can be scored in singles, twos, threes, fours and sixes, fours and sixes are called boundaries, this is when the batsman hits the ball and it goes over the boundary rope (the outer marking of the field). A four is a boundary along the ground - having bounced, a six is when it goes over the boundary rope without touching the ground. There are other types of runs, generally called extras, they consist of wides, leg byes, byes, no balls. These are generally contributed when the bowler or fielder make a mistake. Wickets: There are a numbers of ways of getting out while batting: * You can be bowled - when bowler bowls ball and it hits your wickets. * You can be caught - bowler bowls ball, you hit it, and a fielder, wicket keeper or bowler catches the ball before it bounces. * LBW - Leg Before Wicket - ball hits leg while standing in front of wicket. See: * Run-out - The ball is returned to the stumps and the bails are dislodged (with the ball) from the stumps before the running batsman makes his ground. * Stumped - The batsman, when trying to hit a ball bowled at him, leaves his ground and the wicket-keeper succeeds in dislodging the bails from the stumps before the batsman can remake his ground.


How can you make a good cricket wicket?

You can make a good cricket pitch by following the the following instructions: 1. Cut grass 2. Buy a wicket maker 3. Insert wicket maker onto cut grass 4. Have a beer and wait a couple of hours for the wicket maker to do its business 5. Cut grass 6. Invite England cricket team or some other team of a similar playing standard eg. Russia to the party to celebrate the opening of you brand new test standard wicket


Out in cricket?

There are 6 ways in cricket in which you can get out in cricket: 1)Bowled-The ball hits the stumps then the person playing the role of the batsman is out 2)Caught-The ball touches any part of the bat and is caught in One's hand before it falls on the ground then you are caught 3)Run out there are creases in cricket.When you hit the ball you take a run . if the fielder throws the ball and hits the wicket before you reach the other crease you are run out. The non-strike batsman can also be run-out if he is outside his crease. 4)Leg Before Wicket (LBW).If your leg is in the line of the wicket and the ball hits your leg instead of hitting the wicket then you are out LBW 5)stumped-As I said there are creases in cricket when you go down your crease and hit it goes a great shot! But if you miss and don't return until the wicket keeper hits the wicket then you are out! 6)Hit wicket-By chance while playing a shot your bat touches the wicket and the bails on the wicket fall off you are out


If a bowler bowls a cricket ball at 90 miles per hour how long will it take to get to the batsmen?

just over half a secondI refer you to the answer on this site by apepper to a similar question regarding a bowler reaching 65mph rather than 90mph;"Its not possible to give an exact answer as the ball will slow down through the air and when it bounces, but 65 mph is approximately 32 yards per second, so it will take around 2/3 second to reach the batsman."There are other questions to be considered - Exactly when and where (and how) are you measuring the speed of the ball? Jeff Thompson (Australian fast bowler) was believed/measured to reach 112mph or 180kph in French money, "from out of hand". i.e. the fastest point in its flight.That second paragraph was not written by apepper but I cannot figure out how to switch off italics even though I seem to have managed it.Also, if you consider the point at which the ball leaves the bowler's hand, it will be beyond the "popping crease" - this is the white line beyond which a bowler is not allowed to step whilst still holding the ball. Couldn't resist getting Michael Holding in there - another plus 100mph bowler. Because they are leaning forward, a six foot seven bowler (and some are) can reduce the length of the wicket by at least a yard before he even releases the ball. Other factors such as a following wind, a sloping wicket or perhaps an inconsistency in the flatness of the wicket - for example a little "hump" that the ball hits on its downside may affect the speed of the ball before it arrives at its victim.Whatever you believe it is incontestable that - at top-level - a batsman has less than one-half of one second to "read" that ball, select a stroke, and play it. Yet they do. Someimes they smack it out of the ground. How do they do that? I can't even walk. It reminds me of that "proof" that shows that bees cannot possibly fly.We will never know who was/is/will be "The Fastest Bowler". Which is probably just as well because you certainly would not enjoy facing any of the candidates.

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