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Being Caught

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โˆ™ 2009-07-09 20:22:28
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Q: What is the only way that a cricket batsman can be dismissed from a no ball?
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In cricket if no ball is thron and batsman is heat wicket he is out or not out?

Not out. Only way to get batsman out when a no ball is thrown is run out.


How can a batsman be dismissed while playing a no ball?

There is only one way. Player should be run out.


What is free hit in cricket?

This concept is unique to Twenty20 cricket. If a bowler is called for a "No Ball" because a bowler overstepped the popping crease, then the bowler's next delivery is declared a "Free Hit," which means that a batsman cannot be dismissed by a catch, bowling, LBW, or stumping. He can only be dismissed by those methods that happen to be allowed under a No Ball--most notably run out.


Why offside in cricket is called so?

there is no such thing as offside in cricket - the only thing that resembles this is if over 2 fielders are behind the batsman on the leg side - this is a no ball.


Who is the only Indian batsman to have no ducks in his entire cricket career?

Yashpal Sharma


What does ibw mean in cricket?

Leg before wicket-when your leg covers the wicket when the ball hat hit the leg. Only taken into concideration when the batsman is not playing a shot and when the ball has pitched in line with the wickets.


Can batsman stump out of a no ball or free hit?

No. you can only be run-out off a no-ball or free hit


How all can be out in a cricket match?

A bats man can be in 10 ways in the cricket of any format i.e. test cricket, one day internationals, or t20 cricket matches.1. Bowled: The bowler has hit the wicket with the ball and the wicket has "broken" with at least one bail being dislodged (note that if the ball hits the wicket without dislodging a bail, it is not out).2. Caught: The batsman has hit the ball with his bat, or with his hand which holding the bat and the ball has been caught before it has touched the ground by a member of fielding side.3. Leg Before Wicket: First and foremost, the ball must, in the opinion of the on-field umpire, be going on to hit the stumps if the ball had not hit the pad of the batsman first. If the batsman plays and attempted shot to the delivery, then the ball must hit the batsman's pad in line with the stumps and be going on to hit the stumps for the batsman to be given out. If the batsman does not attempt to play a shot, then the ball doest not have to hit the pad in line with the stumps but it still must be going on to hit the stumps. If the ball pitches outside the leg stump, the batsman cannot be given out under any circumstances.4. Run Out: A member of fielding side has broken or "put down" the wicket with the ball while a batsman was out of his ground; this usually occurs by means of an accurate throw to the wicket while batsmen are attempting a run.5. Stumped is similar except that it is done by the wicketkeeper after the batsman has missed the bowled ball and has stepped out the his ground, ans is not attempting a run.6. Hit Wicket: A batsman is out hit wicket, if he dislodges one or both bails with his bat, person, clothing or equipment in the act of receiving a ball, or in setting off for a run having just received a ball.7. Hit the Ball Twice: is very unusual and was introduced as a safety measure to counter dangerous play and protect the fielders. The batsman may legally play the ball a second time only to stop the ball hitting the wicket after he has already played it.8. Obstructed the field: another unusual dismissal which tends to involve a batsman deliberately getting in the way of fielder.9. Handled the ball: A batsman must not deliberately touch the ball with his hand.10. Timed Out usually means that the next batsman did not arrived at the wicket with three minutes of the previous one being dismissed.


How do you hit runs in ea sports cricket 2005?

the only way is to hit the ball and press the D key to run you can run twice if you press it again but its a big risk to get the batsman out


Who was the only batsman who hit 100 in his debut match?

Manoj Tiwary of Kolkata in Indian cricket team.


Is there any chance of stumped out in free hit ball?

A batsman can only be run out off a free hit ball.


If the ball hit by a batsman hits the helmet behind the wicketkeeper run credited to batsman?

No, it will be awarded as leg byes. Runs are only credited to the batsman if it comes off his bat or glove.


Who is the only batsman in world cricket who scored 7000 ODI run with a strike rate of over 100?

Sachin


Can a batsmen be given stumped out on a free hit?

As per the new law of ICC; a batsman can only be dismissed through 'run out' in a 'free hit'.


Who is the only batsman to score hundreds in all three sessions of the same day in first class cricket?

virender sehwag


In cricket can you get two people out in 1?

In cricket you can't get two people out in one movement like (for example) what happens in baseball. However if a bowler bowled a wide or a no-ball it is possible that a batsman might get out and then when the "replacement" delivery is bowled a second batsman could go out too... hence only one delivery has been counted from the innings, yet two batsmen would have been given out.


What ways can you be out in cricket?

There are 11 ways of getting out. The most common are bowled, caught, run out or LBW. The 11 are:- 1. Retired - If any batsman leaves the field of play without the Umpire's consent for any reason other than injury or incapacity, he is recorded as being Retired - out unless the opposing captain says he can play on. 2. Bowled - This is where the bowler's delivery hits the stumps and knocks a bail off the top, either directly or after being deflected by the bat or batsman's body. 3. Timed Out - If a new batsman isn't ready to bat within three minutes of the last batsman being out then the new batsman is out. 4. Caught - This is where the ball is caught by any of the fielding team after being struck by the bat or the batsman's gloves before the ball hits the ground. 5. Handled the Ball - If the batsman touches the ball without the fielders' permission then the batsman is out on appeal. 6. Hit the Ball Twice - This is where the batsman intentionally hits the ball twice with the bat, usually to stop the ball hitting the stumps or to stop the ball being caught. 7. Hit wicket - This is where the batsman knocks a bail off the top off the stumps either with the bat or leg. A batsman isn't out if the batsman hits the wicket to prevent a run-out or a part of the batsman's equipment falls off onto the stumps. 8. Leg Before Wicket (LBW) - If the batsman uses any part of his body to block a bowl that would have hit the wicket, then the batsman is out. The batsman is only out if the point of impact is within the lines between the batsman's and bowler's stump if the batsman hits a stroke or the ball hits the batsman outside the off-stump or between the lines between the stumps if the batsman doesn't hit a stroke. 9. Obstructing the Field - If the batsman obstructs the fielders either by actions or words then the batsman is out, but the batsman can stand in front of the fielders. The batsman can be given out for obstruction if they hit the ball being thrown back to the stumps. 10. Stumped - If the batsman steps over the crease and leaves no part of his body or bat on the ground behind the crease, then the wicket-keeper can knock a bail off the stumps then the batsman is out. This is usually done with spin bowling as the wicket-keeper is close to the stumps. 11. Run-out - This is where the fielder uses the ball to knock the bails off the stumps when the batsman is running between the creases. The batsman closest to the broken stumps is out. Batsmen can't be out if any part of the batsman's body or bat is behind the crease unless both batsmen are behind the same crease. A run-out can only be called if a fielder has touched the ball, so if the batsman hits the ball into the other batsman's stumps then no batsmen are out.


If batsman hit a ball and go for a 1 run and if in return the fielder overthrows the ball and the ball hit the helmet on the ground how much runs will be counted will be it is 5 or 6 and will this run?

there will only b a penalty run for the batsman . so he gets 2 runs


Why only run out is allowed in no ball?

because the batsman can't cheat by running to many runs as possible


If it hits your leg pad in cricket and is caught is it out?

In general, no. The ball must touch either bat (including the handle) or the hand hold the bat following a legal delivery, then be caught and controlled without touching the ground, for a catch to be a dismissal. Only if the ball clips the both the bat and the pad and is caught, an umpire should rule it out; this will be ruled a catch even if the batsman is out in another way, unless the batsman is also bowled out. There is of course the chance that a batsman was out lbw and then the ball caught with no contact to the bat/hand; they would then be out lbw.


How many batsmen out in one ball?

Your question is a bit confusing. If i think what your tryin to ask is"How many batsmen can get out in one ball?" Only one batsman can get out in one ball.


If the fielder hits the stump with his leg at that time the fielder have the ball at that time the batesman is not in the crease In this case the batsman is out or not?

In this particular situation, the batsman is not out.This is because the wicket was not put down properly. According to Law 28 of the Laws of Cricket, only the ball itself or a hand or arm that is in possession of the ball can properly put down the wicket.Having said this, there is still the potential for the batsman to be run out in this scenario. If the fielder, having realized his mistake, either reassembles the wicket and then properly puts down the bails or uses the ball or the hand or arm with the ball to uproot one of the remaining stumps, either one before the batsman can make his ground by returning behind the popping crease, a run out can still be called.


Is baseball the only sport you play with a ball and a bat?

Cricket for one


How many types of getting out in no ball of cricket?

only run out and stumpping


How can you be out?

In cricket a batsman can "declared out" in a number of ways~ # Caught - When a fielder catches the ball before it bounces and after the batsman has struck it with the bat or it has come into contact with the batsman's glove while it is in contact with the bat handle. The bowler and catcher are both credited with the dismissal. (Law 32) # Bowled - When a delivered ball hits the stumps at the batsman's end, and dislodges one or both of the bails. This happens regardless of whether the batsman has edged the ball onto the stumps or not. The bowler is credited with the dismissal. (Law 30) # Leg before wicket (lbw) - When a delivered ball strikes the batsman's leg, pad or body, and the umpire judges that the ball would otherwise have struck the stumps. The laws of cricket stipulate certain exceptions. For instance, a delivery pitching outside the line of leg stump should not result in an lbw dismissal, while a delivery hitting the batsman outside the line of the off stump should result in an lbw dismissal only if the batsman makes no attempt to play the ball with the bat. The bowler is credited with the dismissal. # Run out - When a fielder, bowler or wicket-keeper removes one or both of the bails with the ball by hitting the stumps whilst a batsman is still running between the two ends. The ball can either hit the stumps directly or the fielder's hand with the ball inside it can be used to dislodge the bails. Such a dismissal is not officially credited to any player, although the identities of the fielder or fielders involved are often noted in brackets on the scorecard. # Stumped - When the batsman leaves his crease in playing a delivery, voluntarily or involuntarily, but the ball goes to the wicket-keeper who uses it to remove one or both of the bails through hitting the bail(s) or the wicket before the batsman has remade his ground. The bowler and wicket-keeper are both credited. This generally requires the keeper to be standing within arm's length of the wicket, which is done mainly to spin bowling. (Law 39) # Hit wicket - When the batsman knocks the stumps with either the body or the bat, causing one or both of the bails to be dislodged, either in playing a shot or in taking off for the first run. The bowler is credited with the dismissal. (Law 35) # Handled the ball - When the batsman deliberately handles the ball without the permission of the fielding team. No player is credited with the dismissal. (Law 33) # Hit the ball twice - When the batsman deliberately strikes the ball a second time, except for the sole purpose of guarding his wicket. No player is credited with the dismissal. (Law 34) # Obstructing the field - When a batsman deliberately hinders a fielder attempting to field the ball. No player is credited with the dismissal. (Law 37) # Timed out - When a new batsman takes more than three minutes to take his position in the field to replace a dismissed batsman. (If the delay is protracted, the umpires may decide that the batting side has forfeited the match). This rule prevents the batting team using up time to unfair advantage. No player is credited with the dismissal. (Law 31)