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Q: What did satchel paige look like in his childhood?
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What were some of the modern batting stats for baseball player Satchel Paige in 1948?

In 1948, Satchel Paige played for the Cleveland Indians. On Base Percentage (OBP) is considered by many to be a better measure of a great hitter than the Batting Average. It is calculated with the formula (Hits + Walks + Hit by Pitch) / (At Bats + Walks + Hit by Pitch + Sacrifice Flies). In 1948, Satchel Paige had 23 at bats, 2 hits, 0 walks, and was hit by the pitch 0 times. Sacrifice flies weren't counted before 1954. That gives him an On Base Percentage of .087. Slugging Percentage (SLG) is a popular measure of a batter's power. It is calculated as (Total Bases) / (At Bats). Another way to look at it is (Singles + 2 x Doubles + 3 x Triples + 4 x Home Runs) / (At Bats). In 1948, Satchel Paige had 23 at bats, and hit 2 singles, 0 doubles, 0 triples, and 0 home runs, for a .087 slugging percentage. Being able to get on base and to hit for power are two of the most important offensive skills in baseball, so the On Base Percentage and Slugging Percentage are often added together. On-base plus slugging (OPS) is a sabermetric baseball statistic. The best hitters in Major League Baseball can achieve an OPS of .900 or higher. In 1948, Satchel Paige had a .087 On Base Percentage and a .087 Slugging Percentage for an OPS of .174. Runs Created (RC) is a baseball statistic invented by Bill James to estimate the number of runs a hitter contributes to his team. There are a number of formulas used to calculate it. One of the simplest is (On Base Percentage) × (Total Bases). In 1948, Satchel Paige had a .087 On Base Percentage and 2 Total Bases for .17 Runs Created.


What were some of the modern batting stats for baseball player Satchel Paige in 1949?

In 1949, Satchel Paige played for the Cleveland Indians. On Base Percentage (OBP) is considered by many to be a better measure of a great hitter than the Batting Average. It is calculated with the formula (Hits + Walks + Hit by Pitch) / (At Bats + Walks + Hit by Pitch + Sacrifice Flies). In 1949, Satchel Paige had 16 at bats, 1 hit, 2 walks, and was hit by the pitch 0 times. Sacrifice flies weren't counted before 1954. That gives him an On Base Percentage of .167. Slugging Percentage (SLG) is a popular measure of a batter's power. It is calculated as (Total Bases) / (At Bats). Another way to look at it is (Singles + 2 x Doubles + 3 x Triples + 4 x Home Runs) / (At Bats). In 1949, Satchel Paige had 16 at bats, and hit 1 single, 0 doubles, 0 triples, and 0 home runs, for a .063 slugging percentage. Being able to get on base and to hit for power are two of the most important offensive skills in baseball, so the On Base Percentage and Slugging Percentage are often added together. On-base plus slugging (OPS) is a sabermetric baseball statistic. The best hitters in Major League Baseball can achieve an OPS of .900 or higher. In 1949, Satchel Paige had a .167 On Base Percentage and a .063 Slugging Percentage for an OPS of .229. Runs Created (RC) is a baseball statistic invented by Bill James to estimate the number of runs a hitter contributes to his team. There are a number of formulas used to calculate it. One of the simplest is (On Base Percentage) × (Total Bases). In 1949, Satchel Paige had a .167 On Base Percentage and 1 Total Bases for .17 Runs Created.


What were some of the modern batting stats for baseball player Satchel Paige in 1951?

In 1951, Satchel Paige played for the St. Louis Browns. On Base Percentage (OBP) is considered by many to be a better measure of a great hitter than the Batting Average. It is calculated with the formula (Hits + Walks + Hit by Pitch) / (At Bats + Walks + Hit by Pitch + Sacrifice Flies). In 1951, Satchel Paige had 16 at bats, 2 hits, 0 walks, and was hit by the pitch 0 times. Sacrifice flies weren't counted before 1954. That gives him an On Base Percentage of .125. Slugging Percentage (SLG) is a popular measure of a batter's power. It is calculated as (Total Bases) / (At Bats). Another way to look at it is (Singles + 2 x Doubles + 3 x Triples + 4 x Home Runs) / (At Bats). In 1951, Satchel Paige had 16 at bats, and hit 2 singles, 0 doubles, 0 triples, and 0 home runs, for a .125 slugging percentage. Being able to get on base and to hit for power are two of the most important offensive skills in baseball, so the On Base Percentage and Slugging Percentage are often added together. On-base plus slugging (OPS) is a sabermetric baseball statistic. The best hitters in Major League Baseball can achieve an OPS of .900 or higher. In 1951, Satchel Paige had a .125 On Base Percentage and a .125 Slugging Percentage for an OPS of .250. Runs Created (RC) is a baseball statistic invented by Bill James to estimate the number of runs a hitter contributes to his team. There are a number of formulas used to calculate it. One of the simplest is (On Base Percentage) × (Total Bases). In 1951, Satchel Paige had a .125 On Base Percentage and 2 Total Bases for .25 Runs Created.