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Yes, it doesn't matter if it's the Pitching Coach or the Manager, it still counts as a visit to the mound. The only instance in which mound trips by coaches do not count is if they're checking on a pitcher to make sure they're not hurt and they let the umpire know before their trip to the mound.

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โˆ™ 2009-05-11 03:56:14
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Q: Is it considered a visit to the mound if the pitching coach goes out?
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Were do the visits counts for a pitcher at the mound or the line?

Rule 8.06 of the Official Baseball Rules (2011, pp 78-79) does not state where the visit counts, but it does state that the visit is officially over when the coach or manager leaves the 18' circle of the pitcher's mound. If he turns around to talk to the pitcher after he walks off the mound, it is considered a second visit and the pitcher must be replaced. For the rest of this answer I will just use "coach." The coach does not get counted for a mound visit when he steps over the line, because he is allowed to visit an infielder as well. However, if that infielder then communicates with the pitcher, it will be counted as a mound visit. So basically, it is considered a mound visit if the coach goes out to communicate in some way or another to the pitcher. Let's just assume that the coach isn't stupid and wants to communicate with the pitcher in a way that the other team can't hear him. He would be counted a visit the moment he stepped foot on the mound, as the umpires would then know his intention is to talk to the pitcher.


Is it considered a visit to the mound if a coach goes to the mound while a pitcher is warming up between innings?

Yes. The only time a manager can go to the mound and it not be considered a visit is if the manager believes his pitcher is injured. In that case the home plate umpire will accompany the manager to the mound and listen to the entire conversation to ensure that the manager and pitcher are not talking strategy but solely about how the pitcher is feeling.


If a coach goes on the field while his team is playing defense does it count as a visit to the mound?

Not necessarily. He could be arguing a call. If he talks to the pitcher, though. There probably is an infraction.Here is part of the rule: A manager or coach is considered to have concluded his visit to the mound when he leaves the 18-foot circle surrounding the pitcher's rubber.Rule 8.06 Comment: If the manager or coach goes to the catcher or infielder and that player then goes to the mound or the pitcher comes to him at his position before there is an intervening play (a pitch or other play) that will be the same as the manager or coach going to the mound.


Is it considered a visit to the mound if a coach goes to the mound while a pitcher is warming up before the first pitch of the game is thrown?

Yes it is and coaches may not warm up a pitcher before innings either,


Does the same pitcher have to be removed on the second timeout if the coach proceeds to the umpire to make defensive change including the pitcher?

I am not sure if the following will help. When the second trip to the mound happens in the same inning the pitcher has to be replaced. on a timeout no... u dont have to change the pitcher... if it is the 2nd "Mound Visit" with the coach on the mound yes. when only a catcher is talking to the catcehr or anyone already on the field it doesnt count. it is not considered a mound visit until the coach steps over the foul line. if there are 2 mound visits in in 2 different innings for the same pitcher u can remain on the mound


Can two different coaches visit the mound in the same inning with out pulling the pitcher?

No. The team gets one visit to the mound per inning and on the second visit, the pitcher must be replaced. It doesn't make any difference what coach makes the visit.


What is considered a trip to the mound?

A "trip" or "visit" to the mound is an actual baseball rule, not baseball announcer slang. Rule 8.06 reads:A professional league shall adopt the following rule pertaining to the visit of the manager or coach to the pitcher:(a) This rule limits the number of trips a manager or coach may make to any one pitcher in any one inning(b) A second trip to the same pitcher in the same inning will cause this pitcher'sautomatic removal(c) The manager or coach is prohibited from making a second visit to the mound while the same batter is at bat, but(d) if a pinch-hitter is substituted for this batter, the manager or coach may make a second visit to the mound, but must remove the pitcher.And further: A manager or coach is considered to have concluded his visit to the mound when he leaves the 18-foot circle surrounding the pitcher's rubber.There is nothing in the rules that states when the "visit" actually begins. I have seen coaches walk out of the dugout, request time out, cross the foul line, then suddenly veer off and go to the first or third baseman, and this has not been considered a visit. I believe the interpretation is that the visit starts whenever a) the coach enters the 18 foot pitcher's circle, or b) if the pitcher leaves the 18 foot pitcher's circle and actually starts talking with the coach.There is nothing in this rule that addresses anything about a reason for the visit. However, typically, if the pitcher appears to be injured in some way, it is not considered a visit, but the umpire is usually there to ensure there is no strategy being discussed.


Is there a rule about the number of times a baseball manager can walk out to the mound?

In MLB, a manager/coach is allowed one visit to the mound per inning. Should the manager/coach make a second visit in an inning, the pitcher must be removed. An exception to this rule is when the manager/coach makes a visit due to an injury to the pitcher. In this case, no visit is charged. You might notice, when a manager/coach makes a 'regular' visit, the home plate umpire stays at home plate and will not approach the mound until a certain amount of time has elapsed to break up the conversation and get the game moving. When a manager/coach makes a visit for an injury, the home plate umpire will stand near the manager/coach and pitcher monitoring the conversion to ensure it is only about the injury and not about any strategy.


How many times can a coach go to the pitcher's mound before the pitcher has to leave the game in dixie youth baseball?

I'n most Dixie leagues, the coach may visit the mound twice in an inning before the pitcher must be replaced


Who is charged with the visit to the mound when pitchers are changed?

Not sure I understand the question. The defensive team's manager or any member of the coaching staff can go to the mound to talk to a pitcher. When the second visit of an inning occurs to a particular pitcher, that pitcher must be taken out of the game. Visits to the mound are credited to the team and not the manager or a specific coach.


Is it possible to remove the manager and leave the pitcher in the game on second visit?

I'm assuming you're talking about a second visit in the same inning. If so, the answer is no. The manager cannot substitute his own leave to keep the pitcher in the game. Rule 8.06 A professional league shall adopt the following rule pertaining to the visit of the manager or coach to the pitcher: (a) This rule limits the number of trips a manager or coach may make to any one pitcher in any one inning; (b) A second trip to the same pitcher in the same inning will cause this pitcher's automatic removal from the game; (c) The manager or coach is prohibited from making a second visit to the mound while the same batter is at bat, but (d) if a pinch-hitter is substituted for this batter, the manager or coach may make a second visit to the mound, but must remove the pitcher from the game. A manager or coach is considered to have concluded his visit to the mound when he leaves the 18-foot circle surrounding the pitcher's rubber.


What is a mound visit for in baseball?

a mound visit is when the coach comes out onto the mound. it is for a number of reasons. it could be to take the pitcher off the mound, give him tips, settle him down, or kill the momentum of the other team. i am a catcher for a AA team right now and when i go up (sometimes by myself) it is just to usually calm him down and stop momentum. one time i came up with my coach and he was asking him random stuff like what his favourite colour is and if he has a girlfriend... just stuff to get ur mind off the game for a few seconds.

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