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If you mean a jump, it could refer to any of the 360 degree rotation jumps (single salchow, toe-loop, loop, flip, or lutz). If you mean a turn without leaving the ice it could be a single rotation twizzle (a turn that rotates and travels down the ice continuously on one foot) or, if it's on two feet: a turn that is generally referred to simply as a "360". Hope this answered your question.

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11y ago
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15y ago

There are several different "360" turns in figure skating (flip, loop, lutz, toe-loop). What makes them different from one another is whether or not the jump is generated from jumping off of just the blade, the skaters toe pick, the edge the blade is on and whether or not the jump takes off with the skater skating forwards or backwards.

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12y ago

It's a jump where you rotate one time around, hence the "full turn"

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Q: 360 degree turn in figure skating called?
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